This Week’s Small Bite — Choosing a Chef’s Knife

Here are three tips to help you cut to the chase as you choose a chef’s knife.  

1. Make sure the blade extends the entire length of the knife, including through the handle. Plastic or wooden handles attached to a metal blade can break over time.

Note how the blade is all one piece and the handle is riveted to each side.

Note how the blade is all one piece and the handle is riveted to each side.

 2. Don’t be afraid to cop a feel before you buy. Hold several knives and see what weight and blade length feel best to you. 

The top is a standard chef's knife. The middle knife is made by Global, known for their sleek all stainless look. It's much lighter than the standard knife. The bottom knife is a Wustof Santoku, made famous by Rachael Ray before she designed her own brand of knives. The indentations on the blade help keep food from sticking to the knife.

The top is a standard chef's knife. The middle knife is made by Global, known for their sleek all stainless look. It's much lighter than the standard knife. The bottom knife is a Wustof Santoku, made famous by Rachael Ray before she designed her own brand of knives. The indentations on the blade help keep food from sticking to the knife.

 3. Buy the best knife you can afford. A top of the line chef’s knife can cost upwards of $100, but mid-range knives by lesser-known manufacturers can work just as well — provided they meet the criteria in Tip #1.

 

 

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3 Comments

Filed under Small Bites

3 responses to “This Week’s Small Bite — Choosing a Chef’s Knife

  1. Good tip! I have Cutco & Henckels that we got as wedding gifts but here’s where I get confused – there are SO many different types. I’m not a professional in the kitchen but, since you are, does it really matter if I use just one knife for evrything (cutting veggies, cutting meats, etc…) or does it make a difference using the designated knives?

    • Cutlery companies are in the business of selling knives so it’s in their best interest to convince you that you need a knife for every occasion. Most chefs I know use their chef’s knife for just about everything. I will pull out the bread knife if I’m slicing a baguette or a slicer to make cutting meat a breeze, but for everything else my chef’s knife is my go-to knife. Now if you’re taking on more complex tasks than the average home cook (boning whole fish or carving your veggies into geometric shapes) then you may find that those extra knives come in handy. My rule of thumb for knives is the same as for selecting pots and pans — buy what you’ll use and what you’re comfortable with.

  2. Pingback: 5 Kitchen Tools Every Cook Should Have «

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